Some Notes on Film

"A movie is not about what it is about. It is about how it is about it." - Roger Ebert
directingfilm:


Because you do not have to imitate, like painters, sculptors, novelists, the appearance of persons and objects (machines do that for you), your creation or invention confines itself to the ties that you knot between the various bits of reality caught. There is also the choice of the bits. Your flair decides.

~ Robert Bresson
(via a-bittersweet-life)

directingfilm:

Because you do not have to imitate, like painters, sculptors, novelists, the appearance of persons and objects (machines do that for you), your creation or invention confines itself to the ties that you knot between the various bits of reality caught. There is also the choice of the bits. Your flair decides.

~ Robert Bresson

(via a-bittersweet-life)

Greetings, Tumblr-ites!

studiumpunctumshop:

We’re Annie and Tim, and we make and sell zines under the name STUDIUM/punctum.

We’ll be using this here Tumblr to give updates on our zine-ing life, as well as for sharing relevant stuff we’re interested in — other zines we love, used book nerdery, cool illustrations, whatever!

And be sure to check out our Etsy store. We’ve got one zine available there now and two more coming very very soon.

Follow the new STUDIUM/punctum Tumblr if you’re interested in getting updates on all my zine-related activities.

Also: a reminder for any NY readers to stop by our table at the Brooklyn Zine Fest this Saturday. The Some Notes on Film zine will be for sale for a tiny bit cheaper than the price listed on Etsy, and customers who mention the Some Notes on Film Tumblr will get a FREE HIGH FIVE!

anniesoga:

Just a friendly reminder that Tim and I will be tabling at Brooklyn Zine Fest 2014 on Saturday April 26th at Brooklyn Historical Society. We are STUDIUM/punctum, and we’ll be selling a few zines that we wrote this year. Please come say hi, check out our goods, and think about supporting our creative efforts! We’d love to see you there!

If you’re going to be in New York on 4/26, please stop by the Zine Fest and say hello! anniesoga and I will be selling our zines, including Some Notes on Film Vol. 1, a zine about this guy, and a collaborative zine about used books and bookstores. It would be tres cool to meet some Tumblr folk in the “meatspace,” as it were.
And if you can’t make it, the Some Notes on Film zine is still available to purchase on Etsy. The other two I mentioned will be available there after the fest.

anniesoga:

Just a friendly reminder that Tim and I will be tabling at Brooklyn Zine Fest 2014 on Saturday April 26th at Brooklyn Historical Society. We are STUDIUM/punctum, and we’ll be selling a few zines that we wrote this year. Please come say hi, check out our goods, and think about supporting our creative efforts! We’d love to see you there!

If you’re going to be in New York on 4/26, please stop by the Zine Fest and say hello! anniesoga and I will be selling our zines, including Some Notes on Film Vol. 1, a zine about this guy, and a collaborative zine about used books and bookstores. It would be tres cool to meet some Tumblr folk in the “meatspace,” as it were.

And if you can’t make it, the Some Notes on Film zine is still available to purchase on Etsy. The other two I mentioned will be available there after the fest.

SOME NOTES ON FILM ZINE NOW AVAILABLE!!!

I’m happy to announce that after working on it for months and months, the Some Notes on Film zine is now available to purchase.

I’m super proud of the way this turned out, and I’m hoping that you’ll want to take a look for yourself. The zine collects a number of my favorite original essays I’ve written for this blog/tumblr during its first six months - all of them revised and expanded - and adds original illustrations, film stills, and an all new, zine-exclusive essay.

Topics for this issue include:

  • Steve Martin’s goofy tenderness in The Jerk
  • Josh Safdie’s microbudget indie The Pleasure of Being Robbed (as seen on the cover)
  • Brian Eno’s idea of art as a “trigger for experience” (and why I don’t like it)
  • Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye and Renaissance painter Pieter Bruegel
  • Ain’t Them Bodies Saints compared to Terrence Malick’s Badlands
  • Billy Wilder’s The Apartment and physicality in screenwriting
  • the difficulty of portraying digital life in movies
  • plus a lengthy intro essay on the differences between zines and blogs

Half-sized
56 pages
Black and white
Card-stock cover
Saddle-stitched (stapled)

I’ve always felt that long form writing was best experienced not on a screen. I’m hoping you’ll agree.

You can buy the zine for $4.25 on Etsy.

(not selling internationally at the moment, but should be very soon - let me know if you’re a non-US resident and interested in buying)

PLEASE RE-BLOG FAR AND WIDE, Y’ALL!!

"And after all, as soon as we talk about ‘theme’ we’re accepting that the narrative itself is subordinated to a non-narrative relationship, a structure of ideas, or a super-entity."

Raymond Durgnat

"In the end one can’t define auteurs by their plot patterns, but predominately, or only, by atmospheres generated by style. That’s what Cahierism was supposed to be about, until the “literary” Anglo-Saxon auteurists and the verbocentric structuro-semiologists reverted to ‘literary elements.’"

Raymond Durgnat

"There’s really a traditional Hollywood style of filmmaking that’s based on the story, and a European style which is more discursive and atmospheric; you can see it in Renoir and Hitchcock. Even in apparently narrative film, the entire narrative exists largely to maneuver two or three scenes into position to maximum effect. The narrative really has only a framing function. It’s a static construction, essentially. The particular scenes which are being nurtured are actually functioning in a lyrical way. They correspond to a lyrical poem rather than a narrative poem. It’s true that action may go on in them, but nonetheless they’re a lyrical description of an overall — and in that sense, static — situation. Hitchcock said of his English films that the central idea was just to present a series of strong scenes, and never mind how the people got from A to B. When he got to America, he found everybody worrying whether the plot was plausible or not, so he had to change his method of constructing a movie."

Raymond Durgnat

"There’s this thing that Keith [Talbot], my mentor, used to say, where he said, ‘A story if it’s working is always an answer to the question ‘how should I live my life?"

Ira Glass


It is hard to make sense of the world or even to take in a collection of things, which is, in some way, a personal museum or analog of a world. Daniel Maidman, in a recent essay about the Triptych on Huffington Post comments, quite brilliantly, on the poignancy and tragedy of this quest. Perhaps we are all on a journey, Sisyphus-like, searching for windmills, as Cervantes would say. […]
As far as your evocation of the link between art and birth, my strong belief is that life is full of wondrous possibilities and in its quixoticness, the only thing we can do is take a shot at what we want, what we believe in. It’s an amazing game, the only down side is that none of us gets out of this game alive. It’s once around and that is it. Herman Hesse’s Siddharta puts his head to the ground to listen. “I can think. I can wait. I can fast.”

Read the rest of my interview with artist Simon Dinnerstein on his painting The Fulbright Triptych at Medium.com

It is hard to make sense of the world or even to take in a collection of things, which is, in some way, a personal museum or analog of a world. Daniel Maidman, in a recent essay about the Triptych on Huffington Post comments, quite brilliantly, on the poignancy and tragedy of this quest. Perhaps we are all on a journey, Sisyphus-like, searching for windmills, as Cervantes would say. […]

As far as your evocation of the link between art and birth, my strong belief is that life is full of wondrous possibilities and in its quixoticness, the only thing we can do is take a shot at what we want, what we believe in. It’s an amazing game, the only down side is that none of us gets out of this game alive. It’s once around and that is it. Herman Hesse’s Siddharta puts his head to the ground to listen. “I can think. I can wait. I can fast.”

Read the rest of my interview with artist Simon Dinnerstein on his painting The Fulbright Triptych at Medium.com

"I have sought that lost grace in the film-making process, where the material things of the world – money, buildings, sets, plastic, metal, people – disappear into a camera and become nothing but light and shadow flickering on a wall: matter into spirit, the alchemists would say."

— John Boorman, Money Into Light: A Diary